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Land and Natural resource management

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People tend to take care of what is their own. The destabilisation of customary lands and resource management by the British invasion and the subsequent transfer of ownership of these lands by the Kaunda regime into the unified state in 1973 has left Zambia's common resources in a bad place with the Zambian people unclear about what is theirs and what is not.  People can often be heard shrugging off customary norms on common resources with the response "Ndí fya boma", a colonial era sentiment  meaning it "belongs to government" impying it's not ours, so its fair game to plunder. The delicate covenants of trust key to equitable sharing of resources have been broken, undermined by modern values of individual ownership and exploitation.  

There is growing international consensus that the solution to the tragedy of the commons is to privatise land on a large scale following the western model in order to clarify ownership and increase values and encourage investment.

Whilst we agree there is need for investment in agriculture, we belive alienating land on a large scale will exacerbate not solve poverty and poverty related problems. Outgrowing schemes to support existing farmers and natural resource management structures such as IRDNC in Namibia are far more beneficial to the environment and the empowerment of disenfranchised indigenous people. 


 
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